An Air Purifier for Beijing?

The smog free tower, an outdoor air cleaner has been tested in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and will be moved to a public spot in Beijing in September to undergo further testing.
Date of Release: 
Aug 1 2016

While it is recognized that this tower cannot solve the choking smog of Beijing, it is still quite remarkable (pictured below).

Just 23-foot tall, the Smog Free Tower is the world's first outdoor air cleaner. It operates with a powerful vacuum to suck up pollution into a powerful ionization process and to filter out the dangerous particles and releases purified air. Based upon the Rotterdam tests, the Tower can eliminate 70-80 percent of the impurities in the air from an area the size of a football stadium. The carbon particles extracted from the air will be compressed and sealed in acrylic in the form of rings, cuff links and cubes and then sold with the proceeds intended to be utilized to finance future towers.

This Tower utilized existing technology for purification systems took two years to develop with an investment of around one million euros by Studio Rooseguaarde. In addition to crowdfunding, the Studion obtained additional funding from the city of Rotterdam, its port facility and a Dutch foundation, Stichting Doen.

The air quality index, used in many countries, is an aggregate measure of various pollutants in the air. Currently, any reading above 200 for more than three days in Beijing will prompt a red alert, which activates numerous contingency plans that can disrupt jobs and businesses.

Now Beijing is revising down its standards as past red alerts were causing chaos with complete Beijing shutdowns. A red alert, the highest level of a four-tier warning system, will only now be issued if the daily average air quality index is forecast to exceed 500 for one day, 300 for two days or 200 for four days, as reported by Xinhua, the state news agency.

Beijing is also reportedly considering a plan to build five ventilation corridors to improve urban air circulation. The corridors, each at least 1,500 feet wide, would run through the city, passing through parks, inner-city lakes and public spaces. Also being planned, the reports said, are an unspecified number of narrower corridors. It is not clear how much the project would cost or when it would be finished. While these are not solutions for Beijing's air pollution, they will offer some relief beyond the very local solutions that can be offered by devices such as the Smog Free Towers.

Source URL: Real Return Environment

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