Odd-Even Scheme in India

Little impact: Odd-even reduced emissions by 3-4%

Date of Release: 
Feb 12 2016

NEW DELHI: Though the Delhi government claims the odd-even scheme to be a success, the experiment's actual impact, even in a best case scenario, did not reduce PM2.5 emissions by more than 3-4%, according to a Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) analysis.

"The emission reduction is assessed to be about 3-4% (including indirect impacts) as other factors may play a major role," says the study by CPCB, concluding that the odd-even policy is unlikely to result in any substantial air quality improvement.

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Odd-Even Scheme: Phase II To Be Implemented From April 15-30

Date of Release: 
Feb 20 2016

NEW DELHI -- The second phase of the odd-even traffic-control formula will be enforced in the national capital from April 15 to April 30, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal announced today.

Addressing a press conference on Thursday, Kejriwal said feedback collected over emails, phone calls, and in public meetings, revealed that 81 percent of residents wanted the government to bring back the scheme, which allows odd and even numbered cars on Delhi roads on alternate days, and 60 percent wanted this to be a permanent plan.

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Night-time pollution reduced in Delhi; SC-directed measures helped: EPCA

Date of Release: 
Feb 18 2016

The Supreme Court-appointed Environment Pollution Control Authority (EPCA) on Thursday reportedly said during a hearing on pollution in New Delhi that the night-time pollution in the city has reduced. It also told the court that the measures directed by the Supreme Court for reducing pollution in the National Capital Region helped in minimising the pollution level.

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Odd-Even scheme: NGT seeks air quality report from government

Date of Release: 
Jan 30 2016

The green tribunal on Friday directed the Delhi government to submit a report on ambient air quality in the national capital during the implementation of the odd-even scheme.

The direction came while hearing a plea seeking ban on three-wheelers running on two-stroke engines and quadricycles on the ground that they cause pollution.

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Just Odd-even is Not Enough, Says CPCB

Date of Release: 
Jan 25 2016

NEW DELHI: The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) has found lack of any clear trends and wide fluctuations in concentration of pollutants during the odd-even experiment in Delhi. The lack of any clear trend shows that no single action can substantially reduce air pollution levels in the capital, the CPCB said in a report.

While there was likely to be some reduction in air pollution due to the odd-even scheme, a single factor or action cannot substantially reduce air pollution levels in Delhi, it said.

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Odd-even formula not a sustainable solution

Date of Release: 
Jan 20 2016

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recently declared Delhi as the most polluted city in the world. Undoubtedly, it is so, as the data on various parameters of air quality index (AQI)—particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10), oxides of nitrogen, sulphur, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—brings out. Besides vehicular traffic of all types, there are other activities such as construction, burning of biomass, dust on the roads, cooking, industry, diesel generator sets, etc, which contribute to air pollution.

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Air pollution became worse during odd-even days, claims online portal

Date of Release: 
Jan 18 2016

The odd-even plan of the Delhi government may have reduced congestion on the Capital’s roads with the AAP government celebrating the “success” of its odd-even scheme on Sunday but data shows the city’s air quality worsened during the 15-day trial which ended on January 15.

According to web portal IndiaSpend’s air-quality monitoring devices, air-pollution levels in the city went up by 15% during the 15-day period when the odd-even plan was in effect, when compared to the last 15 days of 2015 (till December 31, 2015).

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Odd-even scheme in Delhi: None agree how to measure air quality

Date of Release: 
Jan 18 2016

The odd even scheme has seen widespread debate over its impact on the quality of Delhi’s air. Some agencies have come out with data on dips in specific pollutants on certain dates, others have called such claims premature. So what makes it so difficult to arrive at a quantitative assessment of air quality that can be directly related to the restrictions imposed on vehicles during the fortnight January 1 to January 15?

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