Mass Fish Deaths

The Fallout From Vietnam's Mass Fish Deaths Continues

Date of Release: 
Aug 27 2016

The mystery of Vietnam’s mass fish deaths was officially solved two months ago when Formosa Ha Tinh Steel (FHS) was found to be behind the discharge of toxins into the ocean on the country’s central coast. However, the saga continues to play out on various fronts.

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Formosa to pay US$500mil. compensation for environmental disaster in central Vietnam

Date of Release: 
Jun 30 2016

Formosa also made five commitments, including $500 million of compensation. It was the official information released at a government press conference in Hanoi this afternoon.

The press conference attracted public attention since it released the long-awaited official causes of mass fish deaths in the central coastal provinces of Ha Tinh, Quang Binh, Quang Tri and Thua Thien Hue.

At the press conference, a record of Hung Nghiep Formosa Ha Tinh Limited Company Chairman Chen Yuan Cheng’s apology to Vietnamese people was also released.

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Vietnam investigates mass fish deaths

Date of Release: 
Apr 21 2016

Vietnam said on Thursday it was investigating whether pollution is to blame for a spate of mysterious mass fish deaths along the country’s central coast after huge amounts of marine life washed ashore in recent days.

Tonnes of fish, including rare species which live far offshore and in the deep, have been discovered on beaches along the country’s central coastal provinces of Ha Tinh, Quang Tri, Quang Binh and Hue.

“We have never seen anything like it,” aquaculture official Nhu Van Can told AFP on Thursday.

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Alarm over Rayong fish deaths

Date of Release: 
Mar 19 2016

RAYONG — Fishermen and activists in this eastern province want an investigation into the exact cause of mass fish deaths, which authorities insist are part of a natural phenomenon that occurs every year.

However, some local people suspect waste discharged from factories at the Map Ta Phut industrial estate could be linked to the thousands of dead fish that have washed up on Ta Kuan beach.

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